The Project

 

[one_half]First and foremost, thank you for reading The Borderless Project. We’re so grateful to have you here! Two years ago we met in Rio de Janeiro (Megan was working as an English teacher, Henry was traveling for the Soccer World Cup), and we quickly bonded over our love of food, music, exploring, creativity, good company, and of course- travel. It didn’t take long before we were making plans to travel the rest of South America together, and with that came the realization that we wanted a place to share our adventures.

As we began backpacking South America, it also became clear that there was a lack of resources for those who wanted to travel like us (cheaply, like a local, with no fixed plans, and with a strong intention of getting off the beaten path and just lost enough). We wanted information that helped us get to the heart of each destination…we wanted the kinds of tips that can only be taught by other backpackers, that usually exist as word of mouth on the road and nothing more.

So, as you do, when you can’t find it, you make it. We moved to Lima, Peru (Henry’s hometown), got an apartment for 6 months, and set to work. Taping up practice logos on the wall, covering the back of the door with post-its of article ideas. Two travelers possessed, inspired, and sparkly-eyed at the prospect of making our vision a reality. Of creating a blog, a community, where travelers like us could find the resources and inspiration they need. Something that got others out there in one way or another.

[/one_half]

[one_half_last]The Borderless Project in Lima Peru[/one_half_last]

[tg_divider style=”dotted”]

[quote]

The Dream

[/quote]

 

 

[one_half]

In November 2014, we launched www.TheBorderlessProject.com. Our palms were sweaty, we kept refreshing the page to make sure it was real, and we treated ourselves by jumping up and down and just looking at it happily, hoping that this would be the start of something great.

It began with a commitment to write personal stories about our lives and adventures traveling, to talk to our readers like humans, to share our best advice through helpful travel guides to enable other backpackers to get the best experience on a budget, and to use a mix of photos, videos and words to convince as many as possible to get up and get out there. If you didn’t believe it was possible before, we hoped that our blog would prove that you could actually do it- and tell you exactly how.

We spent the rest of the year in South America, living and working in Lima for a few months before taking the long way back to Rio de Janeiro in time for Carnival. A few more months in South America and it was finally time for Megan’s flight home to Los Angeles, California. Luckily, Henry decided to follow suite and the South America adventures turned North, with a few months to explore the West Coast before deciding if we could keep this thing up. Asia was on the horizon and it was looking pretty good…

With a quick dismissal of jobs that pay more and boring concepts like stability, we decided to do it. We bought tickets to Southeast Asia in November 2015, committed 100% to the blog, and jetted off. And here we are now, at a total of 2 years and 15 countries later, and we think it’s fair to say that we’re kind of thriving.

We continue to open ourselves up on the blog, and pour everything we have into it. It’s not always easy, but we’d be lying if we said it wasn’t a dream come true. Maybe not everyone’s dream, but it works for us.

As we’ve grown, we’ve realized that there are too many stories to be told and tips to share, that we can’t possibly cover on our own. A project without borders, there’s always room for more talent, and we have finally had the chance to make our blog bigger than ourselves.

We have just added our first new member to The Borderless Project tribe, fellow badass backpacker on the road with us, Lauren Riley. You’ll find her engaging and entertaining stories from around the world appearing on here regularly now, and we look forward to growing even further beyond ourselves in the next few years.

We hope you’ll stick along for the ride to see what happens next!

[/one_half]

[one_half_last]

Local School Girls near Inle Lake, Myanmar (Trek from Kalaw to Inle Lake with Eversmile Trekking, Myanmar)--- The Borderless Project

Como haces para viajar tanto Henry Urrunaga

[/one_half_last]

[tg_divider style=”dotted”]

 

 

[quote]

Dreamers

[/quote]

 

 

[one_half]

Henry Urrunaga Diaz.

Born and raised in Lima, Peru, I began working as a bartender in hostels at the age of 20. Watching young backpackers pass by, I finally realized something wasn’t right. Six months later I was on a bus to Chile, and I haven’t stopped traveling since.

One of the things I really love when traveling is sharing South America with the people I meet. Football, food, family, friends and working online are the other things that also matter in my life, and what inspire me to keep doing what I’m doing. I hope to keep traveling and working abroad in many new places.

Que Hubiera Pasado Emilio Historia de mi encuentro cercano con Emilio Estefan

Before The Borderless Project… Eight years ago, I went to the United States and everything changed. I returned to Lima after four months, full of doubts. That year I graduated in Communications, which was supposed to prepare me to get a real job. It didn’t, and I ended up doing the bartending job from above, which led to three years of working in hostels and traveling around South America. In 2013, I went on a big trip to Europe. It was a dream, but I came back broke so I started working at a large tourism company. I was working 9-5, but 24/7 dreaming of my next trip: the World Cup in Rio de Janeiro.

I was planning on quitting my job, but they didn’t want me to, so we made a deal so that I could work from abroad. It was amazing. Working while traveling…I could get used to it. I made my way by land from Lima to Rio, and you know how the rest of the story goes!

[/one_half]

[one_half_last]

Megan Spurrell.

Originally from a small oceanside suburb of Los Angeles, USA, most of my family trips growing up were to National Parks on the West Coast. I loved it, but my world truly opened up when I took my first trip out of North America on a summer exchange program in France. I was only 16, had a month to take care of myself, and returned with two realizations: there was so much out there to discover, and I now felt sure that I could take on the world by myself. Travel is a powerful drug for someone who can’t even legally drink or buy a lottery ticket.

portada

I travel (and live) for people, food, and those unexpected moments where I don’t understand how I got there. I don’t think there’s any greater joy than sharing a spontaneous adventure or meal with people you love- or strangers you just met.

Before The Borderless Project… After the trip to France and my growing love for travel, I was quick to find the next opportunity to go abroad. In my junior year of college at USC, I went with the Communications program to Amsterdam, and somewhere amongst the canals, bicycles, and beautiful bluntness of everyone around me, my love became an addiction. I graduated school, backpacked Southeast Asia, met a ton of people who had found a way to live and travel, and took a cue from them. No 9-5 called to me like a life abroad did, so I signed up for a course to become an English teacher in none other than Rio de Janeiro, where our story begins.

[/one_half_last]

[tg_divider style=”dotted”]

 

why we travel?

[one_half][quote]”We travel to see things for ourselves, to watch the oft-photographed bucket list destinations come alive before us. To watch the mist move off of Machu Picchu in the morning, just like all of the photos said it would, but also to stay after the other tourists have gone and explore the far-off corners with nobody around except a few wandering llamas.”[/quote]

[quote]”We travel to try foods we’ve never heard of, to watch daily life that seems monotonous to locals but is endlessly fascinating to us, to remind ourselves that we’ll never see it all.”[/quote]

[/one_half]

[one_half_last][quote]”We travel to meet people, locals and other travelers, who challenge our ideas and give us new perspectives. To learn how the world looks from where they stand, rather than only from our point of view. To trek through the countryside of Myanmar learning from our local guide about the struggles of her country, while also hearing about the refugee situation in Berlin from a German and the systematic struggles of the Republic of the Congo from a man who is half French, half Congolese. To be stopped by a vendor in Yogyakarta, Indonesia’s bird market, who tells us of how difficult it is for him to travel- and why we should be so grateful that we can.”[/quote][/one_half_last]

[quote]”And now, we travel to share our experiences with others. Hopefully, to inspire and help people experience the joy of travel like we have. The type of joy that comes from the unplanned discovery of places, people, and eventually, ourselves.”[/quote]